The Amazon principle: All supermarkets could soon look like this

Upon entering the branch, customers must check in to the store using the Rewe Pick&Go app. Then they can take as many products as they want from the shelves and put them in the cart.

In addition to smart cameras, there are weight sensors in the shelves that detect when a product is removed. After the customer leaves the store, the invoice appears in the app. The price will then be debited automatically. If a product was incorrectly assigned, customers have the option to file a complaint up to 48 hours after purchase.

This is strongly reminiscent of Amazon GO’s supermarket offensive in the US and Britain. The company has been testing walk-in technology since 2016 and opened the first fully stand-alone store in Seattle in 2018. Amazon GO customers can also shop without checking out. The Amazon account is then debited. But what concrete advantages does this have for companies?

Sales expert Heinemann explains to CHIP that supermarkets want to save money in the future, especially in the area of ​​personnel costs. “The last big chunk to gain are cashiers. Because food retailers are also facing severe cost pressure due to the current year, they are now tackling this issue.”

It’s not surprising. The current EHI study “Staff Costs in Supermarkets” shows that 13% of sales are used to pay staff. In addition to serving customers and putting away goods, employees spend about twenty percent of their working time at the checkout. This proportion does not apply to fully autonomous supermarkets.

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